Google iOS search app adds Touch ID for reentering your private searches

Google’s iOS search app can unlock your incognito mode private searches using Touch ID.

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Google iOS search app adds Touch ID for reentering your private searches

Google iOS search app adds Touch ID for reentering your private searches

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Google announced improvements to the iOS search app. The biggest update seems to be with the incognito mode searching, private searching.

Now you can easily search within the Google iOS app in incognito mode and the cool thing, you can continue your incognito mode searches where you left off using the Apple Touch ID feature.

Google said:

When you have incognito mode turned on in your settings, your search and browsing history will not be saved. And for added security, you can enable Touch ID for incognito mode, ensuring that only you can re-enter your existing incognito session if you exit the app.

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Mediatek’s developer board features a 10-core chip and Android 6.0

Like PCs, developer boards like Raspberry Pi are getting more horsepower to run faster applications and 4K graphics.

Take the Mediatek X20 Development Board, which started shipping for $199 this week. It’s crammed with the latest mobile chips that give the developer board PC-like computing power.

It has a 10-core Mediatek X20 chip, which is being used in new mobile devices from companies like Meizu and LeEco. The board comes with Android 6.0, and it’s not yet known if it will be upgraded to Android 7.0.

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Programmable chips turning Azure into a supercomputing powerhouse

An Altera Stratix V developer board, which uses the same kind of FPGA as Microsoft is deploying in Azure. (credit: Altera)

Microsoft is embarking on a major upgrade of its Azure systems. New hardware the company is installing in its 34 datacenters around the world still contains the mix of processors, RAM, storage, and networking hardware that you’ll find in any cloud system, but to these Microsoft is adding something new: field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), highly configurable processors that can be rewired using software in order to provide hardware accelerated implementations of software algorithms.

The company first investigated using FPGAs to accelerate the Bing search engine. In “Project Catapult,” Microsoft added off-the-shelf FPGAs on PCIe cards from Altera (now owned by Intel) to some Bing servers and programmed those FPGAs to perform parts of the Bing ranking algorithm in hardware. The result was a 40-fold speed-up compared to a software implementation running on a regular CPU.

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Bringing IoT data into public clouds is getting easier

The formidable processing power and analytical tools available in public clouds could make industrial IoT more effective and less expensive. But bringing IoT data into the cloud takes more than a network connection.

On Tuesday, two companies moved to help enterprises adapt their IoT data for popular cloud services. OSIsoft introduced its PI Integrator for Microsoft Azure, and Particle announced a custom integration with Google Cloud Platform.

While some large enterprises with sensitive IoT data do all their analytics in-house, public clouds offer greater scale and better security than many organizations can achieve on their own, MachNation analyst Dima Tokar said. More advanced analytics, including better error correction, in some cases can give enterprises the same insights with fewer sensors, he said. Trading hardware for software — especially the cloud-based kind — typically means savings.

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