Category Archives: arstechnica

DHS cyber director warns of surge in Iranian “wiper” hack attacks

An effective wiper of sorts.

Enlarge / An effective wiper of sorts. (credit: Getty Images)

With tensions between the US and Iran on the rise following the downing of a US military drone last week, the director of the Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency is warning that Iran is elevating its efforts to do damage to US interests through destructive malware attacks on industrial and government networks.

In a statement issued on Saturday, June 22, CISA Director Christopher C. Krebs said:

CISA is aware of a recent rise in malicious cyber activity directed at United States industries and government agencies by Iranian regime actors and proxies. Iranian regime actors and proxies are increasingly using destructive “wiper” attacks, looking to do much more than just steal data and money. These efforts are often enabled through common tactics like spear phishing, password spraying, and credential stuffing. What might start as an account compromise, where you think you might just lose data, can quickly become a situation where you’ve lost your whole network.

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Capuchin monkeys have a 3,000-year archaeological record

Capuchin monkeys have a 3,000-year archaeological record

Enlarge (credit: By Tiago Falótico – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=60386655)

The archaeological record of human tools use dates back about 2.5 million years, and archaeologists use changes in stone tool technology to trace changes in human evolution, culture, and lifestyles. Now a team of archaeologists in Brazil has excavated capuchin monkey stone tools dating back to 3,000 years ago, and they reveal changes in behavior and diet over thousands of years—just like the early human archaeological record but on a compressed time scale.

Archaeology: Not just for humans

Bearded capuchin monkeys are more versatile tool-users than chimpanzees. They select rocks of the right sizes and shapes for a variety of tasks, from digging to cracking open a range of nuts and seeds (each has its own size and weight specifications for the perfect cracking tool). Female capuchins even flirt with potential mates by throwing rocks at them.

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Ex-chair of FCC broadband committee gets five years in prison for fraud

A picture of handcuffs on top of a piece of paper with the word,

Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | RapidEye)

The former head of FCC Chairman Ajit Pai’s Broadband Deployment Advisory Committee (BDAC) was sentenced to five years in prison for defrauding investors.

Elizabeth Ann Pierce was CEO of Quintillion, an Alaskan telecom company, when she lied to two investment firms in New York in order to raise $270 million to build a fiber network. She also defrauded two individual investors out of $365,000 and used a large chunk of that money for personal expenses.

Pierce, 55, pleaded guilty and last week was given the five-year prison sentence in US District Court for the Southern District of New York, US Attorney Geoffrey Berman announced. Pierce was also “ordered to forfeit $896,698.00 and all of her interests in Quintillion and a property in Texas.” She will also be subject to a restitution order to compensate her victims “at a later date.”

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SCOTUS: Ban on “FUCT” trademark registration violates First Amendment

SCOTUS: Ban on “FUCT” trademark registration violates First Amendment

Enlarge (credit: Fuct)

Federal law prohibits the registration of trademarks that are “immoral or scandalous.” At least it did until today, when the Supreme Court held that the requirement violated the First Amendment.

The case focused on artist and entrepreneur Erik Brunetti, who sells clothing under the trademark FUCT. Brunetti claims the mark is “pronounced as four letters, one after the other: F-U-C-T.” But a lot of people have interpreted it as (in the words of the government’s lawyer in the case) “the profane past participle form of a well-known word of profanity.”

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German regulator says it discovered new illegal software on Daimler diesels

(Photo by TF-Images/TF-Images via Getty Images)

Enlarge / (Photo by TF-Images/TF-Images via Getty Images) (credit: getty images)

Over the weekend, Germany’s auto regulator told Daimler that it would have to recall 42,000 Mercedes-Benz diesel vehicles after the group discovered illegal software on the cars that would reduce the effectiveness of the emissions-control system.

Daimler said Sunday night that it would take a one-time charge of hundreds of millions of euros against the upcoming quarter’s earnings to deal with the new accusations, but it disputed the government regulator’s determination that the software in question was illegal. According to the Wall Street Journal, Daimler plans to formally object to the claims.

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