Category Archives: smashingmagazine

Design Your Mobile Emails To Increase On-Site Conversion

Design Your Mobile Emails To Increase On-Site Conversion

Design Your Mobile Emails To Increase On-Site Conversion

Suzanne Scacca

2019-06-21T13:00:59+02:00
2019-06-21T17:06:04+00:00

I find it interesting that Google has pushed so hard for web designers to shift from designing primarily for desktop to now designing primarily for mobile. Google’s right… but why only focus on designing websites to appeal to mobile users? After all, Gmail is a leader within the email client ranks, too.

Email can be an incredibly powerful driver of conversions for websites, according to a 2019 report from Barilliance.

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JAMstack Fundamentals: What, What And How

JAMstack Fundamentals: What, What And How

JAMstack Fundamentals: What, What And How

Vitaly Friedman

2019-06-20T14:30:59+02:00
2019-06-21T17:06:04+00:00

We love pushing the boundaries on the web, and so we’ve decided to try something new. You probably have heard of JAMstack — the new web stack based on JavaScript, APIs, and Markup — but what does it mean for your workflow and when does it make sense in your projects?

As a part of our Smashing Membership, we run Smashing TV, a series of live webinars, every week. No fluff — just practical, actionable webinars with a live Q&A, run by well-respected practitioners from the industry. Indeed, the Smashing TV schedule looks pretty dense already, and it’s free for Smashing Members, along with recordings — obviously.

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Optimizing Google Fonts Performance

Optimizing Google Fonts Performance

Optimizing Google Fonts Performance

Danny Cooper

2019-06-20T11:00:16+02:00
2019-06-21T17:06:04+00:00

It’s fair to say Google Fonts are popular. As of writing, they have been viewed over 29 trillion times across the web and it’s easy to understand why — the collection gives you access to over 900 beautiful fonts you can use on your website for free. Without Google Fonts you would be limited to the handful of “system fonts” installed on your user’s device.

System fonts or ‘Web Safe Fonts’ are the fonts most commonly pre-installed across operating systems. For example, Arial and Georgia are packaged with Windows, macOS and Linux distributions.

Like all good things, Google Fonts do come with a cost. Each font carries a weight that the web browser needs to download before they can be displayed. With the correct setup, the additional load time isn’t noticeable. However, get it wrong and your users could be waiting up to a few seconds before any text is displayed.

Google Fonts Are Already Optimized

The Google Fonts API does more than just provide the font files to the browser, it also performs a smart check to see how it can deliver the files in the most optimized format.

Let’s look at Roboto, GitHub tells us that the regular variant weighs 168kb.

Roboto Regular has a file size of 168kb

168kb for a single font variant. (Large preview)

However, if I request the same font variant from the API, I’m provided with this file. Which is only 11kb. How can that be?

When the browser makes a request to the API, Google first checks which file types the browser supports. I’m using the latest version of Chrome, which like most browsers supports WOFF2, so the font is served to me in that highly compressed format.

If I change my user-agent to Internet Explorer 11, I’m served the font in the WOFF format instead.

Finally, if I change my user agent to IE8 then I get the font in the EOT (Embedded OpenType) format.

Google Fonts maintains 30+ optimized variants for each font and automatically detects and delivers the optimal variant for each platform and browser.

— Ilya Grigorik, Web Font Optimization

This is a great feature of Google Fonts, by checking the user-agent they are able to serve the most performant formats to browsers that support those, while still displaying the fonts consistently on older browsers.

Browser Caching

Another built-in optimization of Google Fonts is browser caching.

Due to the ubiquitous nature of Google Fonts, the browser doesn’t always need to download the full font files. SmashingMagazine, for example, uses a font called ‘Mija’, if this is the first time your browser has seen that font, it will need to download it completely before the text is displayed, but the next time you visit a website using that font, the browser will use the cached version.

As the Google Fonts API becomes more widely used, it is likely visitors to your site or page will already have any Google fonts used in your design in their browser cache.

— FAQ, Google Fonts

The Google Fonts browser cache is set to expire after one year unless the cache is cleared sooner.

Note: Mija isn’t a Google Font, but the principles of caching aren’t vendor-specific.

Further Optimization Is Possible

While Google invests great effort in optimizing the delivery of the font files, there are still optimizations you can make in your implementation to reduce the impact on page load times.

1. Limit Font Families

The easiest optimization is to simply use fewer font families. Each font can add up to 400kb to your page weight, multiply that by a few different font families and suddenly your fonts weigh more than your entire page.

I recommend using no more than two fonts, one for headings and another for content is usually sufficient. With the right use of font-size, weight, and color you can achieve a great look with even one font.

Example showing three weights of a single font family (Source Sans Pro)

Three weights of a single font family (Source Sans Pro). (Large preview)

2. Exclude Variants

Due to the high-quality standard of Google Fonts, many of the font families contain the full spectrum of available font-weights:

  • Thin (100)
  • Thin Italic (100i)
  • Light (300)
  • Light Italic (300i)
  • Regular (400)
  • Regular Italic (400i)
  • Medium (600)
  • Medium Italic (600i)
  • Bold (700)
  • Bold Italic (700i)
  • Black (800)
  • Black Italic (800i)

That’s great for advanced use-cases which might require all 12 variants, but for a regular website, it means downloading all 12 variants when you might only need 3 or 4.

For example, the Roboto font family weighs ~144kb. If however you only use the Regular, Regular Italic and Bold variants, that number comes down to ~36kb. A 75% saving!

The default code for implementing Google Fonts looks like this:

<link href="https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Roboto" rel="stylesheet">

If you do that, it will load only the ‘regular 400’ variant. Which means all light, bold and italic text will not be displayed correctly.

To instead load all the font variants, we need to specify the weights in the URL like this:

<link href="https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Roboto:100,100i,300,300i,400,400i,500,500i,700,700i,900,900i" rel="stylesheet">

It’s rare that a website will use all variants of a font from Thin (100) to Black (900), the optimal strategy is to specify just the weights you plan to use:

<link href="https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Roboto:400,400i,600" rel="stylesheet">

This is especially important when using multiple font families. For example, if you are using Lato for headings, it makes sense to only request the bold variant (and possibly bold italic):

<link href="https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Lato:700,700i" rel="stylesheet">

3. Combine Requests

The code snippet we worked with above makes a call to Google’s servers (fonts.googleapis.com), that’s called an HTTP request. Generally speaking, the more HTTP requests your web page needs to make, the longer it will take to load.

If you wanted to load two fonts, you might do something like this:

<link href="https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Open+Sans:400,400i,600" rel="stylesheet">
<link href="https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Roboto" rel="stylesheet">

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How To Create A PDF From Your Web Application

How To Create A PDF From Your Web Application

How To Create A PDF From Your Web Application

Rachel Andrew

2019-06-19T14:00:59+02:00
2019-06-21T17:06:04+00:00

Many web applications have the requirement of giving the user the ability to download something in PDF format. In the case of applications (such as e-commerce stores), those PDFs have to be created using dynamic data, and be available immediately to the user.

In this article, I’ll explore ways in which we can generate a PDF directly from a web application on the fly. It isn’t a comprehensive list of tools, but instead I am aiming to demonstrate the different approaches. If you have a favorite tool or any experiences of your own to share, please add them to the comments below.

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Unleash The Power Of Path Animations With SVGator

Unleash The Power Of Path Animations With SVGator

Unleash The Power Of Path Animations With SVGator

Mikołaj Dobrucki

2019-06-18T13:30:59+02:00
2019-06-21T17:06:04+00:00

(This is a sponsored article.) Last year, a comprehensive introduction to the basic use of SVGator was published here on Smashing Magazine. If you’d like to learn about the fundamentals of SVGator, setting up your first projects, and creating your first animations, we strongly recommended you read it before continuing with this article.

Today, we’ll take a second look to explore some of the new features that have been added to it over the last few months, including the brand new Path Animator.

Note: Path Animator is a premium feature of SVGator and it’s not available to trial users. During a seven-day trial, you can see how Path Animator works in the sample project you’ll find in the app, but you won’t be able to apply it to your own SVGs unless you’re opted-in for a paid plan. SVGator is a subscription-based service. Currently, you can choose between a monthly plan ($18USD/month) and a yearly plan ($144USD total, $12USD/month). For longer projects, we recommend you consider the yearly option.

Path Animator is just the first of the premium features that SVGator plans to release in the upcoming months. All the new features will be available to all paid users, no matter when they subscribed.

The Charm Of Path Animations

SVG path animations are by no means a new thing. In the last few years, this way of enriching vector graphics has been heavily used all across the web:

Animation by Codrops
Animation by Codrops (Original demo) (Large preview)

Path animations gained popularity mostly because of their relative simplicity: even though they might look impressive and complex at first glance, the underlying rule is in fact very simple.

How Do Path Animations Work?

You might think that SVG path animations require some extremely complicated drawing and transform functions. But it’s much simpler than it looks. To achieve effects similar to the example above, you don’t need to generate, draw, or animate the actual paths — you just animate their strokes. This brilliant concept allows you to create seemingly complex animations by animating a single SVG attribute: stroke-dashoffset.

Animating this one little property is responsible for the entire effect. Once you have a dashed line, you can play with the position of dashes and gaps. Combine it with the right settings and it will give you the desired effect of a self-drawing SVG path.

If this still sounds rather mysterious or you’d just like to learn about how path animations are made in more detail, you will find some useful resources on this topic at the end of the article.

No matter how simple path animations are compared with what they look like, don’t think coding them is always straightforward. As your files get more complicated, so does animating them. And this is where SVGator comes to the rescue.

Furthermore, sometimes you might prefer not to touch raw SVG files. Or maybe you’re not really fond of writing code altogether. Then SVGator has got you covered. With the new Path Animator, you can create even the most complex SVG path animations without touching a line of code. You can also combine coding with using SVGator.

To better understand the possibilities that Path Animator gives us, we will cover three separate examples presenting different use cases of path animations.

Example #1: Animated Text

In the first example, we will animate text, creating the impression of self-writing letters.

Final result of the first example
Final result of the first example (Large preview)

Often used for lettering, this cute effect can also be applied to other elements, such as drawings and illustrations. There’s a catch, though: the animated element must be styled with strokes rather than fills. Which means, for our text, that we can’t use any existing font.

Outlining fonts, no matter how thin, always results in closed shapes rather than open paths. There are no regular fonts based on lines and strokes.

Outlined fonts are not suitable for self-drawing effects with Path Animator

Outlined fonts are not suitable for self-drawing effects with Path Animator. (Large preview)

Path animations require strokes - these paths would work great with Path Animator

Path animations require strokes. These paths would work great with Path Animator. (Large preview)

Therefore, if we want to animate text using path animations we need to draw it ourselves (or find some ready-made vector letters suitable for this purpose). When drawing your letters, feel free to use some existing font or typography as a reference — don’t violate any copyright, though! Just keep in mind it’s not possible to use fonts out of the box.

Preparing The File

Rather than starting with an existing typeface, we’ll begin with a simple hand-drawn sketch:

A rough sketch for the animation

A rough sketch for the animation (pardon my calligraphy skills!) (Large preview)

Now it’s time to redraw the sketch in a design tool. I used Figma, but you can use any app that supports SVG exports, such as Sketch, Adobe XD, or Adobe Illustrator.

Usually, I start with the Pen tool and roughly follow the sketch imported as a layer underneath:

Once done, I remove the sketch from the background and refine the paths until I’m happy with the result. No matter what tools you use, nor technique, the most important thing is to prepare the drawing as lines and to use just strokes, no fills.

These paths can be successfully animated with Path Animator as they are created with strokes

These paths can be successfully animated with Path Animator as they are created with strokes. (Large preview)

In this example, we have four such paths. The first is the letter “H”; the second is the three middle letters “ell”; and “o” is the third. The fourth path is the line of the exclamation mark.

The dot of “!” is an exception — it’s the only layer we will style with a fill, rather than a stroke. It will be animated in a different way than the other layers, without using Path Animator.

Note that all the paths we’re going to animate with Path Animator are open, except for the “o,” which is an ellipse. Although animating closed paths (such as ellipses or polygons) with Path Animator is utterly fine and doable, it’s worth making it an open path as well, because this is the easiest way to control exactly where the animation starts. For this example, I added a tiny gap in the ellipse just by the end of the letter “l” as that’s where you’d usually start writing “o” in handwriting.

A small gap in the letter ‘o’ controls the starting point of the animation

A small gap in the letter ‘o’ controls the starting point of the animation. (Large preview)

Before importing our layers to SVGator, it’s best to clean up the layers’ structure and rename them in a descriptive way. This will help you quickly find your way around your file once working in SVGator.

If you’d like to learn more about preparing your shapes for path animations, I would recommend you check out this tutorial by SVGator.

It’s worth preparing your layers carefully and thinking ahead as much as possible. At the time of writing, in SVGator you can’t reimport the file to an already existing animation. While animating, if you discover an issue that requires some change to the original file, you will have to import it into SVGator again as a new project and start working on your animation from scratch.

Creating An Animation

Once you’re happy with the structure and naming of your layers, import them to SVGator. Then add the first path to the timeline and apply Path Animator to it by choosing it from the Animators list or by pressing Shift + T.

To achieve a self-drawing effect, our goal is to turn the path’s stroke into a dashed line. The length of a dash and a gap should be equal to the length of the entire path. This allows us to cover the entire path with a gap to make it disappear. Once hidden, change stroke-dashoffset to the point where the entire path is covered by a dash.

SVGator makes it very convenient for us by automatically providing the length of the path. All we need to do is to copy it with a click, and paste it into the two parameters that SVGator requires: Dashes and Offset. Pasting the value in Dashes turns the stroke into a dashed line. You can’t see it straightaway as the first dash of the line covers the whole path. Setting the Offset will change stroke-dashoffset so the gap then covers the path.

Once done, let’s create an animation by adding a new keyframe further along the timeline. Bring Offset back to zero and… ta-da! You’ve just created a self-drawing letter animation.

Creating a self-writing text animation in SVGator: Part 1

There’s one little issue with our animation, though. The letter is animated — but back-to-front. That is, the animation starts at the wrong end of the path. There are, at least, a few ways to fix it. First, rather than animating the offset from a positive value to zero, we can start with a negative offset and bring it to zero. Unfortunately, this may not work as expected in some browsers (for example, Safari does not accept negative stroke offsets). While we wait for this bug to be fixed, let’s choose a different approach.

Let’s change the Dashes value so the path starts with a gap followed by a dash (by default, dashed lines always start with a dash). Then reverse the values of the Offset animation. This will animate the line in the opposite direction.

Reversing the direction of self-writing animation

Now that we’re done with “H” we can move on to animating all the other paths in the same way. Eventually, we finish by animating the dot of the exclamation mark. As it’s a circle with a fill, not an outline, we won’t use Path Animator. Instead, we use Scale Animator to the make dot pop in at the end of the animation.

Creating a self-writing text animation in SVGator: Part 2

Always remember to check the position of an element’s transform origin when playing with scale animations. In SVG, all elements have their transform origin in the top-left corner of the canvas by default. This often makes coding transform functions a very hard and tedious task. Fortunately, SVGator saves us from all this hassle by calculating all the transforms in relation to the object, rather than the canvas. By default, SVGator sets the transform origin of each element in its own top-left corner. You can change its position from the timeline, using a button next to the layer’s name.

Transform origin control in SVGator’s Timeline panel

Transform origin control in SVGator’s Timeline panel (Large preview)

Let’s add the final touch to the animation and adjust the timing functions. Timing functions define the speed over time of objects being animated, allowing us to manipulate their dynamics and make the animation look more natural.

In this case, we want to give the impression of the text being written by a single continuous movement of a hand. Therefore, I applied an Ease-in function to the first letter and an Ease-out function to the last letter, leaving the middle letters with a default Linear function. In SVGator, timing functions can be applied from the timeline, next to the Animator’s parameters:

Timing function control in SVGator’s Timeline panel

Timing function control in SVGator’s Timeline panel (Large preview)

After applying the same logic to the exclamation mark, our animation is done and ready to be exported!

Final result of the first example

Example #2: Animated Icon

Now let’s analyze a more UI-focused example. Here, we’re going to use SVGator to replicate a popular icon animation: turning a hamburger menu into a close button.

Final result of the second example
Final result of the second example (Large preview)

The goal of the animation is to smoothly transform the icon so the middle bar of the hamburger becomes a circle, and the surrounding bars cross each other creating a close icon.

Preparing The File

To better understand what we’re building and how to prepare a file for such an animation, it’s useful to start with a rough sketch representing the key states of the animation.

It’s helpful to plan your animation ahead and start with a sketch

It’s helpful to plan your animation ahead and start with a sketch. (Large preview)

Once we have a general idea of what our animation consists of, we can draw the shapes that will allow us to create it. Let’s start with the circle. As we’re going to use path animation, we need to create a path that covers the whole journey of the line, starting as a straight bar in the middle of the hamburger menu, and finishing as a circle around it.

Complete path of the middle bar animation turning into a circle

Complete path of the middle bar animation turning into a circle. (Large preview)

The other two bars of the menu icon have an easier task — we’re just going to rotate them and align to the centre of the circle. Once we combine all the shapes together we’re ready to export the file as SVG and import it to SVGator.

Our icon, ready to be animated in SVGator

Our icon, ready to be animated in SVGator. (Large preview)

Creating An Animation

Let’s start by adding the first shape to the timeline and applying Path Animator to it. For the initial state, we want only the horizontal line in the middle to be visible, while the rest of the path stays hidden. To achieve it, set the length of the dash to be equal to the length of the hamburger’s lines. This will make our straight middle line of the menu icon. To find the correct value, you can use the length of one of the other lines of the hamburger. You can copy it from the timeline or from the Properties panel in the right sidebar of the app.

Then set the length of the following gap to a value greater than the remaining length of the path so it becomes transparent.

Creating an icon animation in SVGator: Part 1

The initial state of our animation is now ready. What happens next is that we turn this line into a circle. To do that, two things need to happen simultaneously. First, we use Offset to move the line along the path. Second, we change the width of the dash to make the line longer and cover the entire circle.

Creating an icon animation in SVGator: Part 2

With the circle ready, let’s take care of the close icon. Just as before, we need to add two animations at the same time. First, we want the top line to lean down (45 degrees) and the bottom line to move up (-45 degrees) until they cross each other symmetrically. Second, we need to move the lines slightly to the right so they stay aligned with the circle.

As you might remember from the previous example, in SVGator, transform origins are located in the top-left corner by default. That’s very convenient to us as, in this case, that is exactly where we want them to be. All we need to do is to apply the correct rotation angles.

When it comes to aligning the lines with the circle, note that we don’t have to move them separately. Rather than adding Animators to both of the lines, we can add a group containing both of them to the timeline, and animate them together with a single Position Animator. That’s one of those moments when a nice, clean file structure pays off.

Creating an icon animation in SVGator: Part 3

Next thing to do is add a reverse animation that turns the close button back into a hamburger menu. To achieve that, we can basically follow the previous steps in reverse order. To speed things up a bit, copy and paste the existing keyframes on the timeline — that’s yet another improvement SVGator introduced in the past few months.

Reversing icon animation: back to the hamburger menu.

Once done, don’t forget to adjust the timing functions. Here, I’ve decided to go with an Ease-in-out effect on all elements. Our icon is ready for action.

Final result of the second example

Implementation

Even though implementing microinteractions goes far beyond the scope of this article, let me take a moment to briefly describe how such animation can be brought to life in a real project.

Illustrations and decorative animation are usually more straightforward. Quite often, you can use SVG files generated by SVGator out of the box. We can’t say that about our icon, though. We want the first part of the animation to be triggered when users click the button to open the menu drawer, and the second part of the animation to play once they click it for the second time to close the menu.

To do that, we need to slice our animation into a few separate pieces. We won’t discuss here the technical details of implementing such animation, as it depends very much on the environment and tech stack you’re working with; but let’s at least inspect the generated SVG file to extract the crucial animation states.

We’ll start by hiding the background and adjusting the size of the canvas to match the dimensions of the icon. In SVGator, we can do this at any time, and there are no restrictions to the size of our canvas. We can also edit the styles of the icon, such as color and width of the stroke, and test what your graphic will look like on a dark background using a switch in the top-right corner.

Preparing icon animation for development

When we’re ready, we can export the icon to SVG and open it in a text editor.

Elements you see in the body of the document are the components of your graphic. You should also notice that the first line of code is exceptionally long. Straight after the opening <svg> tag, there’s a <style> element with plenty of minified CSS inside. That’s where all the animation happens.

<svg viewBox="0 0 600 450" fill="none" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" id="el_vNqlglrYK"><style>@-webkit-keyframes kf_el_VqluQuq4la_an_DAlSHvvzUV… </style> <!-- a very long line of code that contains all the animations -->
<g id="el_SZQ_No_bd6">
<g id="el_BVAiy-eRZ3_an_biAmTPyDq" data-animator-group="true" data-animator-type="0"><g id="el_BVAiy-eRZ3">
<g id="el_Cnv4q4_Zb-_an_6WWQiIK_0" data-animator-group="true" data-animator-type="1"><path id="el_Cnv4q4_Zb-" d="M244 263H356" stroke-linecap="round"/></g>
<g id="el_aGYDsRE4sf_an_xRd24ELq3" data-animator-group="true" data-animator-type="1"><path id="el_aGYDsRE4sf" d="M244 187H356" stroke-linecap="round"/></g>
</g></g>
<path id="el_VqluQuq4la" d="M244 225H355.5C369 225 387.5 216.4 387.5 192C387.5 161.5 352 137 300 137C251.399 137 212 176.399 212 225C212 273.601 251.399 313 300 313C348.601 313 388 273.601 388 225C388 176.399 349.601 137 301 137" stroke-linecap="round"/>
</g>
</svg>

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