Category Archives: mozblog

Campaign Tracking Without Going Crazy: Keeping Order in AdWords Optimization

Posted by anthonycoraggio

Pay-per-click advertising generates vast amounts of data, which presents us with tremendous potential for optimization and success. However, this formidable sword cuts both ways—even skilled managers can quickly find themselves adrift if tests and changes are not carefully tracked. Here’s a quick, actionable guide to keeping order in your AdWords account with a simple and professional activity log.

The philosophy of orderly management

Good Adwords management is an exacting science—every tweak and change made should be for a specific reason, with a particular goal in mind. Think in terms of the scientific method: we’re always moving forward from hypothesis, to test, to result, and back again.

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Why I Stopped Selling SEO Services and You Should, Too

Posted by ryanwashere

This post was originally in YouMoz, and was promoted to the main blog because it provides great value and interest to our community. The author’s views are entirely his or her own and may not reflect the views of Moz, Inc.

In my 28 years on this planet, I’ve come to accept two things as fact:

  1. The sun rises every morning.
  2. Marketers screw everything up.

Because of fact No. 2, I had to stop selling SEO.

Why? Here’s an interaction I used to have five times a day.

*Phone rings*

Me: “This is Ryan Stewart with WEBRIS. How can I help you?”

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Beyond the SEO Plateau: After Optimizing Your Website, What’s Next?

Posted by randfish

It’s a near-universal experience for consultants and in-house SEOs who’ve worked on numerous organic search campaigns. The first 3–6 months (longer if the site is very large or complex) of any SEO effort is almost always exclusively dedicated to fixing mistakes, improving existing issues, tweaking and tuning the sub-optimal, and generally closing the gap between what exists now and current best practices.

The beautiful part of SEO is that, once completed, these efforts can have ongoing and compounding benefits for months or years to come. The newly accessible and optimized pages start earning rankings and traffic, which beget more links, more personalization-biasing, more exposure, more sharing, and more business. If you’ve got competent content & dev teams continually checking items off the list (and not creating many new ones), slowly the list of actionable, low-hanging fruit dwindles. I like to call this “the SEO plateau.”

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Beyond the SEO Plateau: After Optimizing Your Website, What’s Next?

Posted by randfish

It’s a near-universal experience for consultants and in-house SEOs who’ve worked on numerous organic search campaigns. The first 3–6 months (longer if the site is very large or complex) of any SEO effort is almost always exclusively dedicated to fixing mistakes, improving existing issues, tweaking and tuning the sub-optimal, and generally closing the gap between what exists now and current best practices.

The beautiful part of SEO is that, once completed, these efforts can have ongoing and compounding benefits for months or years to come. The newly accessible and optimized pages start earning rankings and traffic, which beget more links, more personalization-biasing, more exposure, more sharing, and more business. If you’ve got competent content & dev teams continually checking items off the list (and not creating many new ones), slowly the list of actionable, low-hanging fruit dwindles. I like to call this “the SEO plateau.”

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Importing Cost, Click, & Impression Data to GA Using GA’s Data Import Feature

Posted by TrentonGreener

Google Analytics (GA) is a phenomenal tool that most of us, including myself, use in a very limited capacity. It’s not that we don’t want to use all of the functionality of this great product, but that we’re unaware of the potential opportunities available to us as marketers. Often times, when we do find that new and exciting feature, it astounds and astonishes us; I often find myself consumed by the possibilities. That’s how it felt when I first found GA’s “Data Import” feature. I had no idea that I could load not only my AdWords data into GA, but also all of my other paid efforts as well—from social, to search, to display, and even direct mail. I could import the cost data of each campaign into Google Analytics and do an ROI analysis using functionalities such as the Model Comparison Tool. In this post, I’m going to walk you through how to do exactly that.

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